The Smart Forecaster

Pursuing best practices in demand planning, forecasting and inventory optimization

Protect your Demand Planning Process from Regime Change

Protect your Demand Planning Process from Regime Change

No, not that kind of regime change: Nothing here about cruise missiles and stealth bombers. And no, we’re not talking about the other kind of regime change that hits closer to home: Shuffling the C-Suite at your company. In this blog, we discuss the relevance of regime change on time series data used for demand planning and forecasting.

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Don’t Become a Victim of Your Forecast Models

Don’t Become a Victim of Your Forecast Models

Generally, the supply chain field has lagged behind finance in terms of the use of statistical models. My university colleagues and I are chipping away at that, but we have a long way to go. Some supply chains are quite technically sophisticated, but many, perhaps more, are essentially managed as much by gut instinct as by the numbers. Is this avoidance of analytics safer than relying on models?

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How to Tell You Don’t Really Have an Inventory Planning and Forecasting Policy

How to Tell You Don’t Really Have an Inventory Planning and Forecasting Policy

You can’t properly manage your inventory levels, let alone optimize them, if you don’t have a handle on exactly how demand forecasts and stocking parameters (such as Min/Max, safety stocks, and reorder points, and order quantities) are determined. Many organizations cannot specify how policy inputs are calculated or identify situations calling for management overrides to the policy. If you have these problems, you may be wasting hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars each year in unnecessary shortage costs, holding costs, and ordering costs.

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The 3 levels of forecasting: Point forecasts, Interval forecasts, Probability forecasts

The 3 levels of forecasting: Point forecasts, Interval forecasts, Probability forecasts

There are three possible types of forecasts that can be used in demand and inventory planning processes. Point forecasting, interval forecasting, and probabilistic forecasting. Each type of forecast offers progressively more information to inventory managers that will enhance the planning process. In this video blog, Dr. Thomas Willemain explains the differences and highlights the advantages that probabilistic forecasting offers. In summary, knowing more is always better than knowing less and the probability forecast provides additional information that is crucial for inventory planning.

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