El Blog de Smart

 Siguiendo las mejores prácticas en la planificación de la demanda,

previsión y optimización de inventario

MAX-MIN OR ROP – ROQ

by Philip Slater

This guest blog is authored by Philip Slater, Founder of SparePartsKNowHow.com the leading educational resource for spare parts management. Mr. Slater is a global leader and consultant in materials management and specifically, engineering spare parts inventory management and optimization. In 2012 Philip was honored with a national Leadership in Logistics Education Award. To view the original blog post, click here.

There are essentially two ways that companies express their inventory control settings: either as MAX- MIN (sometimes MIN-MAX) or ROP-ROQ.

Some people will say that it doesn’t really matter which you use, just as long as you understand the definitions and the pros and cons. However, in my experience it does matter and this is one aspect of spare parts inventory management that you really do need to get right.

Let’s Start With the Definitions for MIN, MAX, ROP & ROQ

 

MIN = short for minimum

There is, confusingly, two schools of thought about what is meant by the MIN. Most typically this is the point at which the need to order more stock is triggered. Sometimes, however, the MIN is seen as the minimum quantity that can be safely held to cover expected needs. In this case the need to order more stock is set so that the reorder point is one less than the MIN value. That is. MIN -1.

The key to managing when using a MIN setting is to understand the configuration of the computer system you use, as different definitions will change the resulting holding level, the re-order point, and perhaps even the actual safety or buffer stock.

MAX = short for maximum

This value is most typically the targeted maximum holdings of the item. Usually, in a MAX- MIN system, where the MIN is the reorder point, the quantity reordered after reaching the MIN is the quantity required to get back to the MAX. For example, if the MAX- MIN is 5-2, when the quantity in the storeroom reaches 2, procurement would need to order 3 to get back to the MAX.

ROP = Reorder Point

As the name suggests, quite simply, this is the stock level at which the need to reorder is triggered. This is calculated by determining the safety stock level and the stock required to service needs during the reorder lead time.

ROQ = Reorder Quantity

Again, as the name suggest, this is the quantity to be reordered when the ROP is reached. This is not the EOQ but rather the quantity that both makes economic sense and is commercially available.

MAX-MIN OR ROP – ROQThe Differences are Meaningful and Important

It is essential that every inventory manager understands that the MAX- MIN and ROP-ROQ approaches are not simply interchangeable.

For example, in general terms:

MIN can be equated with the ROP, except if you have a system set up for reordering at a point of MIN-1. In that case, there is no equivalence.

For slow moving items the MAX can in some circumstances be equal to the ROP + ROQ. This is because for slow moving items it is possible that there will be no additional demand before the newly ordered item(s) arrive in stock.

However, with all other items the MAX is UNLIKELY to be equal to the ROP + ROQ as items may be issued between the time of reaching the MIN and the newly ordered items arriving. In fact, there is a logic that says that the MAX would never actually be achieved.

Do these differences matter? I think that they do.

For example, what if you change IT systems? If you move from one type of MAX-MIN system to another but they define the MIN differently then you cannot just migrate your data. This may not seem obvious if everyone is using the language of MAX-MIN but is classic trap where words are used in different ways.

Similarly, if you are benchmarking your holding levels with another company or site then you need to be aware of the different definitions and the outcomes that each approach would achieve. Otherwise you are comparing ‘apples with pears’.

Or what about what happens when a new team members arrives at your company and their previous company used the terms MAX-MIN but with different parameters or meaning to that your company uses. There will likely be an assumption that the terms are used in the same way and this could lead to stock shortages or overstocks, depending on the differences in the definitions.

To add further confusion, some software systems use the term ‘Safety Stock’ to represent the MIN holding level, despite this not being the universal definition of safety stock. This different nomenclature leads some people to assume that holding less than the so-called ‘safety stock’ according to your IT system is ‘unsafe’ or risky, when in fact it may not be at all. They may even be holding an excessive level of stock because they don’t properly apply the term ‘safety stock’. Calling it safety stock does not make it so.

Pros and Cons

MAX-MIN

Pros:

• Conceptually simple to understand.

Cons:

• Terms can be misleading in terms of safety stock and actual maximums.

• Terms are used in different ways and so caution required to ensure a common understanding.

• Values often set using ‘experience’ or intuition.

• Often leads to overstocking while reporting misleading overstock data

ROP-ROQ

Pros:

• Meaning of each term is clear and consistent.

• Values set using auditable logic.

• Safety stock values clearly established.

• Holdings more likely to reflect the actual needs and commercial constraints.

Cons:

• Requires more work to determine the appropriate values.

You Need to Get This Right

The differences between MAX-MIN and ROP-ROQ are not trivial and the terms certainly are not interchangeable. In my experience, the ROP-ROQ approach produces greater transparency and is easier to manage because there is no confusion about the meaning of the terms. This approach also produces a more appropriate and auditable level of inventory.

This suggests that if spare parts inventory management is important to you then you really do need to get this right.

 

Deja un comentario

Artículos Relacionados

El juego de la culpa de la cadena de suministro: las 3 principales excusas para la escasez y el exceso de inventario

El juego de la culpa de la cadena de suministro: las 3 principales excusas para la escasez y el exceso de inventario

La cadena de suministro se ha convertido en el juego de la culpa de casi cualquier problema industrial o minorista. La escasez en la variabilidad del tiempo de entrega, los malos pronósticos y los problemas con datos incorrectos son hechos de la vida, sin embargo, las organizaciones que manejan inventarios a menudo se sorprenden cuando surge cualquiera de estas dificultades. Entonces, de nuevo, ¿quién tiene la culpa del caos de la cadena de suministro? Siga leyendo este blog e intentaremos mostrarle cómo evitar la escasez y el exceso de productos.

Mensajes recientes

  • Supply Chain Math large-scale decision-making analyticsSupply Chain Math: Don’t Bring a Knife to a Gunfight
    Math and the supply chain go hand and hand. As supply chains grow, increasing complexity will drive companies to look for ways to manage large-scale decision-making. Math is a fact of life for anyone in inventory management and demand forecasting who is hoping to remain competitive in the modern world. Read our article to learn more. […]
  • Mecánico barbudo maduro en uniforme examinando la máquina y reparándola en fábricaPlanificación de consumibles frente a piezas reparables
    Al decidir los parámetros correctos de almacenamiento de repuestos y piezas de repuesto, es importante distinguir entre piezas consumibles y reparables. Estas diferencias a menudo se pasan por alto por el software de planificación de inventario y pueden dar lugar a estimaciones incorrectas de lo que hay que almacenar. Se requieren diferentes enfoques al planificar consumibles frente a reparables. […]
  • Cuatro errores comunes al planificar los objetivos de reposiciónCuatro errores comunes al planificar los objetivos de reposición
    ¿Con qué frecuencia recalibra sus políticas de almacenamiento? ¿Por qué? Aprenda a evitar errores clave al planificar objetivos de reabastecimiento mediante la automatización del proceso, la recalibración de piezas, el uso de métodos de previsión de objetivos y la revisión de excepciones. […]
  • Smart Software se complace en presentar nuestra serie de seminarios web, ofrecidos exclusivamente para usuarios de Epicor.Amplíe el pronóstico y la planificación mínima/máxima de Epicor Kinetic con Smart IP&O
    Epicor Kinetic puede administrar el reabastecimiento al sugerir qué ordenar y cuándo a través de políticas de inventario basadas en puntos de reorden. El problema es que el sistema ERP requiere que el usuario especifique manualmente estos puntos de pedido o use un enfoque rudimentario de "regla general" basado en promedios diarios. En este artículo, revisaremos la funcionalidad de pedido de inventario en Epicor Kinetic, explicaremos sus limitaciones y resumiremos cómo reducir el inventario y minimizar los desabastecimientos al proporcionar la sólida funcionalidad predictiva que falta en Epicor. […]
  • Pronóstico basado en escenarios vs EcuacionesPronóstico basado en escenarios versus ecuaciones
    Tradicionalmente, el software ha servido como vehículo de entrega de ecuaciones. Esto está bien, hasta donde llega. Pero en Smart Software creemos que le iría mejor cambiando sus ecuaciones por escenarios. Descubra por qué la planificación basada en escenarios ayuda a los planificadores a gestionar mejor el riesgo y crear mejores resultados. […]

    Optimización de inventario para fabricantes, distribuidores y MRO

    • Pedidos generales Software inteligente Demanda y planificación de inventario HDÓrdenes generales
      Nuestros clientes son grandes maestros que siempre nos han ayudado a cerrar la brecha entre la teoría de los libros de texto y la aplicación práctica. Un excelente ejemplo sucedió hace más de veinte años, cuando nos presentaron el fenómeno de la demanda intermitente, que es común entre las piezas de repuesto pero poco común entre los productos terminados administrados por nuestros clientes originales que trabajan en ventas y marketing. Esta revelación pronto llevó a nuestra posición preeminente como proveedores de software para la gestión de inventarios de piezas de repuesto. Nuestra última parte de la educación se refiere a las "órdenes generales". […]
    • Mano colocando piezas para construir una flechaPronóstico Probabilístico para Demanda Intermitente
      La nueva tecnología de pronóstico se deriva del pronóstico probabilístico, un método estadístico que pronostica con precisión tanto la demanda promedio de productos por período como los requisitos de inventario del nivel de servicio al cliente. […]
    • Ingeniería bajo pedido en Kratos Space: hacer que la disponibilidad de piezas sea una ventaja estratégica
      El grupo Kratos Space dentro del innovador en tecnología de seguridad nacional Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc., produce el software COTS y los productos de componentes para las comunicaciones espaciales: hacer de la disponibilidad de piezas una ventaja estratégica […]
    • figuras-de-madera-de-personas-y-un-iman-equipo-gestion-almacen inventarioGestión del inventario de artículos promocionados
      En una publicación anterior, analicé uno de los problemas más espinosos que a veces enfrentan los planificadores de demanda: trabajar con datos de demanda de productos caracterizados por lo que los estadísticos llaman asimetría, una situación que puede requerir costosas inversiones en inventario. Este tipo de datos problemáticos se encuentran en varios escenarios diferentes. En al menos uno, la combinación de demanda intermitente y promociones de ventas muy efectivas, el problema se presta a una solución efectiva. […]